Avoiding the best of breed vs best in suite technology trap

Have you ever heard your neighborhood barista ask, “would you like your coffee to be hot OR taste good”? Of course not! There is no sense spending the time in line or spending your money if the coffee is not both hot and good.

Unlike your neighborhood barista, many health systems are asking an “either-or “question when it comes to new technology – “do we go to a new vendor for full functionality or use a limited add-on offered by a current vendor?”

CIOs and CTOs have struggled with this same question for years. They often follow a well practiced analysis of best of breed vs best in suite (in this case probably your current system) by weighing the benefits and costs associated with implementation, integrations, security, networking complexity, user training, duplication of data and processes, timing of upgrades, customizations, flexibility of vendors, user- interfaces, and more.

While this approach may seem “tried and true” it can actually lead to a terrible waste of time and money. The best technology choice will only be found if you start with a entirely different question. Are you going to mandate the use of this technology or give users a choice?

If choice is permitted, then your evaluation process needs to start with user adoption in mind. In that case, here are some criteria to consider:

  • Ease of use- Can people easily understand purpose and use of system?
  • Ease of access- Can people easily find system and log on and off without trouble?
  • Clinical impact – Does using this system improve user ability to accomplish clinical goals?
  • System Support- Is system support uniquely attuned to the medical environment in terminology and speed?
  • System Flexibility- can the system be easily configured to meet unique needs of various service areas?

If you start by defining a platform or tool that your users will actually choose to use before thinking about vendor selection, you are more likely to see a better return on that technology investment in addition to higher user adoption and satisfaction.

If you would like to learn more about our philosophy on technology solution, or talk to one of our customers about their selection process, let us know.


RapidConnect Helps Hospital Regain Key Cardiac Accreditation

WakeMed takes great pride in delivering world-class cardiovascular care, and has been recognized for doing just that over the years. Its Raleigh campus was the first hospital in the nation to achieve the American College of Cardiology Heart Failure Accreditation’s highest level of heart failure accreditation. In 2015, the hospital was also one of only 319 hospitals nationwide to receive the American College of Cardiology’s NCDR ACTION Registry–GWTG Platinum Performance Achievement Award.

However, in 2016 WakeMed was at risk of losing its American College of Cardiology (ACC) Heart Failure Accreditation after not meeting the ACC’s goal of having 75% of heart failure patients scheduled for a follow up visit within 7 days of a hospital discharge. Initially, WakeMed trained Advance Practice Providers (APPs) to use Epic’s Cadence module to schedule those appointments, but fell short of the 75% target. The biggest gap seemed to come with patients admitted to non-cardiology services and for patients discharged after hours and on weekends. Those patients were leaving the hospital before a follow-up appointment could be scheduled and/or added to their discharge papers.

They consulted with MD Interconnect after learning of the platform’s integration with Epic. Thanks to that collaboration, an automatic message is now sent through RapidConnect when heart failure discharge orders are created in Epic. That message is routed, in real-time, to someone who can schedule a follow-up appointment before the patient is discharged. The average RapidConnect read time for these discharge order messages is now 13 minutes. The heart failure follow-up appointment is quickly scheduled and that information is included on the patient’s discharge summary.

This new RapidConnect order discharge workflow went live in November of 2017. For the first time ever, WakeMed exceeded the ACC goal with a 85.9% appointment follow-up rate by the end of that month. With help from RapidConnect, they regained their accreditation and received a Silver Plus AHA award for that year.

To learn more about how RapidConnect is helping WakeMed increase the number of cardiac follow-up visits, see the complete use case here.

To learn more about how RapidConnect can help you, contact us.


Hospital compliance officers must think beyond “security” when it comes to text messaging

Today, hospitals know that they need to find HIPAA compliant communication solutions, but often to struggle to identify the right solution and/or to identify (or agree on) who is actually responsible for finding the right solution.

They are starting to realize that finding the right secure communication solution is more than just a technology decision. With ultimate responsibility for adherence to health care regulatory enforcement and compliance activities, more and more compliance officers are now finding themselves playing a key role in that decision-making process. In that new role, they typically work closely with hospital administrators, IT and physician leaders to choose a solution.

We recently spoke with compliance expert John Finley about this topic. His 15-year career has spanned a number of compliance and regulatory roles at WakeMed Health & Hospitals, CHRISTUS Health, Aetna and the FDA.

Finley says that while there may be some confusion around The Joint Commission’s recommendations, there is no official ruling that prohibits hospitals from using secure texting. He knows that texting is a reality of life, and that it has become a regular practice for physicians. He says that he and probably 90% of his peers support the use of texting, if it’s done in a secure manner and doesn’t result in a breach.

“The bottom line is that physicians are already doing it, and it can help deliver better care to patients. We just need to figure out the best way to support that, while minimizing a hospital’s risk and exposure,” Finley explains.

At a minimum, a secure texting solution should meet a checklist of basic security requirements including:

  • Encrypted at rest and in motion
  • Cloud based – nothing stored on phone
  • Secure messages pincode protected (not just phone code)
  • Ability to remotely wipe if lost/stolen

But, Finley emphasized that he and his compliance counterparts need to focus on more than just security and compliance, when thinking about text messaging technology.

We agree. While checking off a list of standard security requirements is a good starting point, choosing a solution can’t stop there. Hospitals still need to balance compliance and security with overriding business goals such as:

  • Improving care
  • Reducing costs
  • Increasing growth

To support these goals, hospitals should look for a solution that offers a number of other benefits including:

  • Inpatient/outpatient integration
  • EPIC integration – particularly for consult requests
  • Designed to stay compliant with all stark/anti-kickback regulations
  • Flat license fee with ability to broadly distribute
  • Implementation process that actively engages users to promote adoption
  • Offers a solution for physicians in the OR/procedure rooms
  • Message preference routing (includes residents, fellows, mid-level providers)
  • Integrates with nurse duty phones
  • Addresses call center and ED volume issues

Finley also emphasized that technology is only one part of a true secure messaging “solution”, and that hospitals need to implement policies and practices that support the use of these technologies. They are increasingly looking to vendors to help provide these “guardrails for proper texting” and to help them think through a number of “what if scenarios” to ensure ongoing compliance and usage.

It’s also important for hospitals to think about communication outside their own four walls. Implementing a secure communication solution becomes more complicated when it has to be managed across a wider care continuum. Today, hospitals must collaborate with multiple providers and rely heavily on physician referrals. As a result, they need to communicate and share patient information across numerous organizations.

A solution that supports in-hospital communication only or in-hospital workflows only, won’t truly address their communication or compliance needs, and won’t truly improve overall patient care. The right secure communication solution should support communication, collaboration and care coordination across the entire patient care continuum.

If you would like to learn more about how MD Interconnect does just that, or to learn how WakeMed addresses the need for HIPAA-compliant messaging, let us know. You can also read the WakeMed case study here.